Synopsis

The information that we now have implies that many millions, probably hundreds of millions, of sentient races have been around in this galaxy for much longer than we have, and the vast majority of them will therefore have surpassed our technical, as well as our mental, capability a very long time ago.

It is currently thought, based on recent measurements by NASA's Kepler telescope, that there are as many as 50 billion planets in our Milky Way galaxy. Of these, 1 in 200, or 250 million, are in the so-called "Goldilocks Zone" (not too hot, not too cold, but "just right") around their parent star, where conditions would support the evolution of sentient life. In "Who The Bleep Designed Us?", the numbers used are from previous information which even then yielded a good probability of hundreds of thousands of other sentient races in the Milky Way.

 

We are "the new kids on the block", who have only had technology (and sentience) for a very short time indeed in cosmic terms. Those millions of ET races will have been sentient for times varying from fairly recent (say a hundred or so thousand years) to as much as a billion or more. This status of ours as recent arrivals on the galactic scene, is what makes us special if not unique. As we approach our first major crisis that could result in a major setback, if not our extinction as a species becuase of our squandering of our planet's resources, we are inevitably of interest to our galactic neighbors, and this is why they are observing and visiting us. It is highly probable, perhaps inevitable, that every developing race goes through one or more crises of the type that we are now experiencing, so that it is not surprising that our neighbors are concerned!

 

The book discuses this and advocates our active efforts to contact and solicit advice and help from our neighbors. They do not appear to be deliberately intervening, bu the evidence is everywhere that they are making their presence known to us. At this point, it is up to us to initiate contact and see if we can benefit from their experience.



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